Stories of SurvivalBOARDING SCHOOL POSTERS, LINKSCULVERT COVER ARTREADER REVIEWSLATEST INFOSCHOOL PHOTOS

Become Aware Of What It Is Really Like To Be Victimized As A Child And How It Feels To Survive The Experience

 

"Just becasue you've been victimized, doesn't mean you have to live the rest of your life as a victim" 

E-MAIL THE AUTHOR HERE

BUY THE CULVERT

CHECK OUT MY YOU TUBE VIDEO ABOUT THE CULVERT

Newly Updated 01-03-14.

THIRD BOOK IS FINISHED!

See "Latest Info" Page

 

BUY BOARDING SCHOOL

CHECK OUT MY YOU TUBE VIDEO FOR BOARDING SCHOOL

Live Through This Incredible Tale
Of The Ultimate Bully

zz12.jpg

Learn How Corrupt Some Within An Institution Can Become

bscover20.jpg
zz13.jpg
bscover21.jpg

THE CULVERT

This is a stroy of triumph over adversity.  With its focus on the seldom discussed topic of child-on-child sexual abuse, the plot of this ground-breaking new novel revolves around the life of a thirteen-year-old boy named Will who, with his parents, lives a pleasant and successful life just outside a small Midwestern town in the U.S. 

The engagin story joins Will at the crest of his innocence.  Soon though, the young boy becomes the victim of a sexual assault and the reader is then given an honest look at the feelings and reactions of both the boy and his assailants during this event.  Afterwards, the reader is taken through the full range of emotions the boy experiences as he tries to come to terms with what has been done to him.  Later, when he learns of other boys in his town who have recently been attacked in the same manner by the same assailants, Will pulls himself together and takes it upon himself to put an end to these assaults. 

With helpful information within its storyline for parents and those readers who themselves are victims of child sexual abuse, THE CULVERT is a testimony to the ideal that a person who is victimized does not have to choose to live the rest of his life as a victim. 

BOARDING SCHOOL

For the first time ever the author reveals the heart wrenching yet poignant account of the experiences he endured while he attended a boarding school in New England during his thirteenth year.  This is above all a bold story of loyalty and friendship which prevailed despite an isolated world of drug and sexual abuse which he and other students his age were pulled into by the people with whom he lived.  From the swimming pool at his parents' house in Denver to a seedy one room apartment on the lower east side of Manhattan, the year the author spent living on his own stripped him of everything he was and challenged the very essence of his character.  His story is a testimony to the infomitable spirit which resides within us all and it stands as an example of how despite crushing odds,  the individual can indeed rise above the events of his past to become the person he chooses to be.  The reader will be moved and inspired by this book and the parent will be informed in ways never before explained as to what it takes to avoid the accidental placement of his/her child into the charge of strangers who may at best be cavalier where the best interests of the young person are concerned.  BOARDING SCHOOL is a must read for all who care for or are concerned about the welfare of children and for those who have suffered set backs in their own lives which they wish to overcome. 

 

FROM THE AUTHOR

 

So, I  am often asked why it is that I have chosen to write stories about sexual  abuse.  After all, just the thought of sexual abuse is so depressing.  We are all aware that such behavior exists but why immerse ourselves in such stories?  We all know about how sometimes kids become victims of sexual abuse so why take the time to read their stories?     

In our society today the act of sexual abuse on a child is considered a crime worse than murder.  If we hear a story about a 13 year old girl having sex with her 30 year old male teacher the first thing we want to do (and rightly so) is to string up the teacher. Yet, if we hear a story about a 13 year old boy having sex with his 30 year old female teacher, his buddies (and most men in their private thoughts) want to throw the boy a party.  Also in general it is believed (wrongly by the way) that if a child is the object of sexual abuse he/she will likely have emotional problems for the rest of his/her life.  So why is our thinking on this subject so scattered and imprecise?  Or more to the point, how can we stop or treat sexual abuse if we don't really understand it?

I don't know why, but through some quirk of fate in my life I have gone through events personally or I have witness events personally or I have been touched deeply by events in the news media or I have found myself conducting personal interviews with victims and perpetrators alike which have brought me in my later years to a level of knowledge in this area which I believe is (shall we say) more factual than the understanding of the average citizen. 

So from the experiences I have eluded to above, I have written the stories you now see on this website  and you won't believe the e-mails of gratitude and appreciation I have received from others who have had similar experiences in their lives.  In fact, many readers tell me that my books are so compelling that they can't put them down once they begin to read them. Believe me, it was not an easy decision for me to write these stories.  After all, burying these stories would have been a heck of a lot easier and safer for me to do.  But that's what everybody does and that (I believe) is the reason why the scourge of child sexual abuse continues to fester in our world. 

And so, if you care about children or if you are responsible for the care of children, my readers will agree that reading my stories should be required of you.  Therefore,  I urge you now to take a bold step and read my books.  And after you've finished, send me an  e-mail to let me know what you think.    

Clint Adams

Author

EXCERPTS 

Below I have posted the first few pages of each book so you can get a feel for what my books are all about. 

THE

CULVERT

by

CLINT ADAMS

LINT ADAMS

© 2004 by Cabin Communications, Inc.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a

retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior

written permission of the publishers, except by a reviewer who may quote

brief passages in a review to be printed in a newspaper, magazine or journal.

First printing

Cover Illustration by Jonathan F. LeGrand

ISBN: 1-4137-6877-6

PUBLISHED BY PUBLISHAMERICA, LLLP

www.publishamerica.com

Baltimore

Printed in the United States of America


TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER ONE 9

HAPTER ONE 9

Friday: The Kiss and the Bully

CHAPTER TWO 88

HAPTER TWO 88

Saturday: Anger, Confusion, Despair and Champaign

CHAPTER THREE 122

HAPTER THREE 122

Sunday: Regaining Senses and Routines

CHAPTER FOUR 139

HAPTER FOUR 139

Monday: The Day of Enlightenment

CHAPTER FIVE 189

HAPTER FIVE 189

Tuesday: Will’s Plan for Jake Is Begun

CHAPTER SIX 206

HAPTER SIX 206

Wednesday: Josh Learns More

CHAPTER SEVEN 214

HAPTER SEVEN 214

Thursday: The Conflict Escalates

CHAPTER EIGHT 217

HAPTER EIGHT 217

The Second Friday: Showdown at School

CHAPTER NINE 230

HAPTER NINE 230

The Second Saturday: The Final Confrontation, and the End

CHAPTER TEN 270

HAPTER TEN 270

The Second Wednesday: A Tribute to Will

 

PREFACE

Life for all of us, as we pursue happiness, is a steady stream of challenges

which we must accept and overcome. Sometimes the challenges are physical,

and sometimes the challenges are mental. But regardless of what form they

take, we as humans know that everyday we live, we are going to be challenged

in some way.

Some of us handle challenges well, while others fall to pieces the moment

something comes along to disturb our routine. In my youth, I discovered that

life runs much more smoothly if I work to adopt the right attitude; that is to

say, a positive attitude. With a positive attitude, the challenges don’t end, but

they become far less disruptive to my life and I am better able to “take them

in stride,” to use a cliché. Over the years, I have integrated my tendency to

handle things in a positive fashion into my life, so that even the big challenges

have been easier for me to deal with.

For example, I have a physical disability which many consider a pretty

severe handicap. At a very early age I learned the sting of prejudice from

teachers and others my age who were convinced that my condition would

make it impossible for me to ever achieve anything in my life. And for a long

time, as an impressionable young boy, I believed them. But once I was half

way through my teen years, I learned (I taught myself actually) that with a

positive attitude, I could do practically anything I set my mind to. Shortly

after that, I decided that my disability was really nothing more than an

occasional inconvenience. Indeed, this inconvenience has skewed my life in

many ways, but overall I find myself today mostly satisfied with how things

have developed for me over the years. I have known others with conditions

similar to mine who, to my mind, have not done as well with their lives. In

every case, the differentiating factor between failure and success has always

been attitude.

CLINT ADAMS

8

As I watch the endless parade of victims pass by me on my cable news

channels these days, I find my views on attitude confirmed. For every malady

or tragedy that I see, the people who come away from their predicaments the

least scathed, are the ones who manage through it all to maintain a positive

attitude. And for every infirmity or calamity which occurs, this principle

always seems to hold true. The people who maintain a positive attitude are the

ones who seem best able to take their challenges in stride. However, I have been

struck in recent years, by the realization that there is one fate whose victims

seem powerless to master any response other than one of utter despair. And

people who become faced with this particular challenge, usually seem to go on

afterwards to live lives which are tortured and never very successful. Who are

these poor unfortunates? I speak of those who are victims of child sexual abuse.

It seems that even the slightest brush with molestation, inevitably brings about

emotional devastation which lasts a lifetime.

I am not a psychologist, but it seems to me that just as my teachers and my

school mates held me down for years, so too does society hold down those

who become victims of child sexual abuse. We are so shocked by the act, we

can’t imagine how anyone who has endured such an ordeal can possibly recover.

And so, people rarely do. This characteristic of our society is truly a tragedy

when a simple change in attitude could give these people a better future.

Like everyone else, my heart goes out to these people. And so to lead the

way, as it were, I have written The Culvert. I wanted to place a story into our

culture which shows how a victim of child sexual abuse can, with the right

attitude, rise above the act which was intended to put him or her down and go

on to live a successful life. It is possible. It can be done. Someone who is

victimized, does not have to become a victim for the rest of his or her life.

Because after all, a decision to live life as a victim is a choice isn’t it? And to

my way of thinking it’s a bad choice. Just like any decision which results in a

loss of potential or self worth is a bad choice. If I had chosen to continue to

believe those who were around me when I was a boy, you would not be buying

this book right now. (You are buying this book aren’t you?)

Once you have read this book, I want you to come away from the experience

with the idea that regardless of what you have had to suffer through in your life,

you can still be successful if you adopt the right – a positive – attitude. And this

advice is intended especially for those who have suffered through the

experience of being abused sexually as a child. All you need to do is simply

recognize that the incident is over. It’s in the past. Now put it behind you and

go live your life!

culture which shows how a victim of child sexual abuse can, with the right

attitude, rise above the act which was intended to put him or her down and go

on to live a successful life. It is possible. It can be done. Someone who is

victimized, does not have to become a victim for the rest of his or her life.

Because after all, a decision to live life as a victim is a choice isn’t it? And to

my way of thinking it’s a bad choice. Just like any decision which results in a

loss of potential or self worth is a bad choice. If I had chosen to continue to

believe those who were around me when I was a boy, you would not be buying

this book right now. (You are buying this book aren’t you?)

Once you have read this book, I want you to come away from the experience

with the idea that regardless of what you have had to suffer through in your life,

you can still be successful if you adopt the right – a positive – attitude. And this

advice is intended especially for those who have suffered through the

experience of being abused sexually as a child. All you need to do is simply

recognize that the incident is over. It’s in the past. Now put it behind you and

go live your life!

The Culvert. I wanted to place a story into our

culture which shows how a victim of child sexual abuse can, with the right

attitude, rise above the act which was intended to put him or her down and go

on to live a successful life. It is possible. It can be done. Someone who is

victimized, does not have to become a victim for the rest of his or her life.

Because after all, a decision to live life as a victim is a choice isn’t it? And to

my way of thinking it’s a bad choice. Just like any decision which results in a

loss of potential or self worth is a bad choice. If I had chosen to continue to

believe those who were around me when I was a boy, you would not be buying

this book right now. (You are buying this book aren’t you?)

Once you have read this book, I want you to come away from the experience

with the idea that regardless of what you have had to suffer through in your life,

you can still be successful if you adopt the right – a positive – attitude. And this

advice is intended especially for those who have suffered through the

experience of being abused sexually as a child. All you need to do is simply

recognize that the incident is over. It’s in the past. Now put it behind you and

go live your life!

9


CHAPTER ONE

FRIDAY: THE KISS AND THE BULLY

RIDAY: THE KISS AND THE BULLY

Will knew this was going to be an outstanding day, even though his morning

was already off to an ordinary start. At five twenty his alarm clock had gone

off as it always did on week days. Then true to his routine, Will had gotten

himself out of bed, thrown on some cloths, straightened his room, and

though he was still not fully awake yet, made his way downstairs in the dark

to the kitchen. After he had finished off a pop tart and some juice, his mom

had appeared and, without either of them uttering a word, Will had followed

his mom out to the car for their daily trip into town. As usual, their’s had been

the only headlights which had shown on the pre dawn road during their ride

in and, as usual, Will’s mom had delivered him to the high school at exactly

ten minutes after six for his six o’clock swim practice.

“McDonald! You’re late!” Coach Hammer had hollered at the very

moment Will had entered the water. When he popped his head back to the

surface to put on his goggles, he could hear the sounds of a couple dozen

young arms and legs slapping the water around him as his teammates swam

their laps. Although these sounds were loud, they were not so loud that Will

couldn’t still hear the booming voice of his coach.

“McDonald! You’re in lane six with Warren. Get going!” Getting yelled

at by Coach Hammer for being late was also part of Will’s morning routine.

Will was now nearly done with his sets, which meant that today’s practice

was almost over. He and his team had competed in the state meet two months

earlier which had left Will ranked as second in the state of Nebraska in the

boys one hundred meter free style for his age group. In fact, the whole team

had made a pretty good showing at State this year. The highest ranked girl on

his team was Will’s friend Sally Brown. She wound up being ranked fifth in

Nebraska in the girls two hundred meter butter fly for the same age group.

CLINT ADAMS

10

Sally had only just moved to Hastings with her brother and her parents last

fall at the beginning of the school year. Back then, she had become enamored

with another boy in Will’s grade named Craig Balsom. Craig had liked Sally

too and in no time they had become boy friend and girl friend. But for some

reason that no one ever seemed to know, Craig and Sally had split up almost

as quickly as they had gotten together. Will had always thought that their

break up had seemed odd because afterwards Craig stopped talking to Sally

altogether. Even today, Will knew that Craig still refused to say anything to

her.

A little later on in the fall after Sally had joined the swim team, Will had

become friends with her. To Will, Sally was just another girl on the team, and

he continued to feel this way about her for most of the winter. Lately, though,

Will was beginning to notice that Sally was seeming a lot more interesting to

be around than she had before. The truth was, Will was going to be fourteen

in another three months and for a while now his body had been changing. Hair

was now growing where it had never grown before, and his Speedo wasn’t

fitting him in the same way it used to. Luckily for the school choir, though, his

voice hadn’t begun to change, really. He was still considered a solid alto.

With his last flip turn now completed, Will began to swim his final length.

He was eager to finish up and get on with his day. One of the reasons why he

was in such a hurry was because he had prepared his oral report for today’s

class in Geography and he was pretty sure that he was going to get an “A” on

the assignment. After days of work, he was ready to describe to his fellow

students the finer details of the Maple Syrup industry in Vermont. But

beyond the anticipation of speaking before his class, Will was excited mostly

over the fact that today was Friday.

This had been the first week since last fall when the temperature had

gotten up into the high seventy’s every day. After being cooped up in doors

all winter, Will knew that it was going to be great to finally be able to do stuff

outside again. He wasn’t planning to do anything special – just stuff.

As Will approached the wall and the end of the day’s practice, the words

of Coach Larry Hammer still resounded in his ears from earlier that morning.

The coach had reminded his swimmers during their mid practice break that

each one of them needed to “control the situation” when they stepped up onto

the platform before each race.

“If you look and act like you control the situation,” Coach Hammer had

preached, “then the other swimmers will be psyched out and they’ll believe

that you’re going to beat them.” The fact was that ever since February when

THE CULVERT

11

the coach had read a new book on how to dominate an opponent, he talked

about “controlling the situation” at nearly every practice. Will had taken the

advice to heart and he believed that it had helped him to do as well as he had

at the state meet.

Will touched the wall and stopped swimming. He pulled his goggles off of

his head and glanced over into the lane next to his while he caught his breath.

He watched as a couple of girls on his team did flip turns at the wall and then

swam off again. In a moment two more girls appeared and did their turns. As

the second pair of girls then glided away, Will fixed his eyes upon them. He

watched as the water made their skin glisten.

While this was going on, Will’s friend Kevin Warren stopped his

swimming for the day at the wall next to Will and took off his goggles also.

“Wo, what a work out!” he said out of breath.

Will ignored Kevin and kept watching the girls as they swam away. “Oh,

man!” Will said just loud enough for Kevin to hear.

With a deep understanding of his friend’s appreciation for their

teammates, Kevin spoke up again. “Hey, be careful Will… you’ll get a

boner,” Kevin then gave a little laugh and quickly climbed out of the pool.

The comment prompted Will to turn and look at his friend. “Yeah, thanks.

I’ll be real careful.” Since it was considered a sign of weakness for a man to

lose control over himself in this area, Will’s response was dripping with

friendly sarcasm.

As he stood on the deck now directly over his pal, Kevin gave another

quick laugh. “Ha! You’ve probably got one right now.” Kevin then turned

and walked away toward the boy’s locker room.

“I do not!” Will called after Kevin who by now had gone too far away

from him to make any further discussion on this matter practical. So with his

interest still high, Will looked back again at the girls in the next lane so he

could continue his study of their forms. A few moments later, Will noticed

that he was staring as their bodies slipped gracefully through the water, and

he found himself wondering what it was about their shapes that made girls so

compelling to watch. Suddenly Will realized that Kevin’s joke had begun to

gnaw at his self confidence. He was aware, after all, that it was difficult

sometimes for him to be able to tell about himself while he was in the water.

To play it safe, Will decided to turn himself around until his back was

toward the rest of his team. Then, as nonchalantly as he could manage, Will

pulled open the front of his swim suit and sneaked a quick look at himself.

“Phew!” Will said under his breath when he saw that he was ok. “That was a

close one.”

Boarding School

by

Clint Adams

© 2008 by Clint Adams.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a

retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior

written permission of the publishers, except by a reviewer who may quote

brief passages in a review to be printed in a newspaper, magazine or journal.

First printing

All characters in this book are fictitious, and any resemblance to real persons,

living or dead, is coincidental.

ISBN: 1-4241-9696-5

PUBLISHED BY PUBLISHAMERICA, LLLP

www.publishamerica.com

Baltimore

Printed in the United States of America



Dedication

To my little buddy Eddie…


Do you remember that day at school when you were thirteen and you came

to my dorm room to ask me a question that was of extreme importance to you?

And do you remember also how you sat down in one of my chairs and then

began to plead with me to let you move in with me? Well, I have never forgotten

that afternoon. In my mind now, I can still hear you promise me that you would

be a good roommate and you would always keep your things neat, and you

would always be quiet whenever I needed to study. “Just say yes,” you kept

repeating. “Come on, please just say yes. That’s all you’ve got to do and I’ll

take care of everything else. I’ll even do all the moving myself. You won’t have

to do a thing to help. Please, just say yes. That’s all you’ve got to do. Just say

yes, please!”

Of course I didn’t say yes that day. I was moved by your pleas, but I had

my own selfish reasons at that time in my life which I believed were more

important than any thirteen-year-old disagreements you might have been

having with your roommate. And it was decades later before I learned the real

reason why you were so desperate to find sanctuary with me.

A few years ago when I was talking with an old friend of ours from those

days, I learned, finally, what it was that your older and larger roommate was

forcing you to do with him every night after lights out. Eddie, I had no idea. I

wish you hadn’t been too frightened or too embarrassed to tell me why it was

that you had to get yourself away from that monster. I wish I had been a little

more on the ball that day so I could have figured out for myself why it was that

you were so distraught over your need to find a safe place to live. You did give

me a few hints about how unhappy you were with your roommate, but nearly

everybody in that place was unhappy with their roommate at one time or

another. So I simply chalked your complaints up to typical roommate

squabbles.

You were a great kid, Eddie, one of the nicest ones there, and it haunts me

now to think of the sex acts you were being forced into performing every night

with that creep. If I had known, if I had possessed any idea at all, I would have

moved heaven and earth to get you out of that situation that day. But I didn’t

know, and so I simply said “no” to your impassioned pleas.

Today I can also recall the look of utter dejection and despair on your face

as you left my room once our conversation had ended. I don’t remember you

speaking very much to me after that. You had placed all of your hope and faith

with me, and I had let you down. In the years that have followed since my

learning of the truth, I have tried to find you so I could apologize for not making

the right choice that day. But all of my efforts to locate you have failed. So I

am dedicating this book to you, Eddie, in the hopes that one day you will pick

up a copy and read this and discover how truly sorry I am for not understanding

you, and that I know now that if I had simply stated a different one-syllable

word—the word “yes”—I could have saved you from the nightmarish

existence that must have been your world at that time. I guess when we’re kids,

we don’t realize how profoundly our decisions can affect the lives of others.

In any case, all my best to you now, Eddie, wherever you are.



Table of Contents


Chapter One

Traveling to Ulster Academy

7

Chapter Two

Settling In

24

Chapter Three

The Day My World Changed

46

Chapter Four

The Training Begins

105

Chapter Five

There’s No Way Back: The Line Is Now Crossed

120

Chapter Six

The Man Who Was Really in Charge

164

Chapter Seven

Being Put to Work

195

Chapter Eight

Finally a Break… Sort Of

224

Chapter Nine

The Pace of Our Work Increases

232

Chapter Ten

New Semester, Old Routine

248

Chapter Eleven

Good-Bye, Good Friends

274

Chapter Twelve

A Lot of Years, a Lot of Changes

306

7


Chapter One

Traveling to Ulster Academy


The Callahan Tunnel. As I pass by this familiar structure so I can steer the

rental car I just picked up back at Logan through the Summer Tunnel instead,

I realize that it has been over thirty years now since I’ve called this area my

home. Thirty years since I’ve thought seriously about the miserable way I was

forced to live when I was an Academy kid, and it has taken thirty years for me

to build up the courage I need to step foot in Boston again.

For those who are in my life today, my entire existence in this part of the

country is now compressed down into an old school catalog, a few odd photos

I took, and the words “Ulster Academy” which I will occasionally mention

when the days of my youth become the topic of discussion. It was better, I

always believed, if the people around me didn’t know anything about the

anguish I suffered. It was better for all concerned, I thought, if I didn’t try to

explain what it is like when a boy’s innocence is suddenly stripped away from

him by the base interests of others who live around him, or how easy it is at an

impressionable age to be sucked up into a life which I would never on my own

have selected for myself. And it was better, I decided, if I didn’t embarrass

myself by revealing all of the unspeakable things they made me do here.

But all of that is behind me now. Not too long ago, I decided to confront

Boston…and the town of Ulster and especially the Academy itself. So I’ve set

aside some time in my schedule today to give me the chance I need to end my

years of concealment of the truth—not only for my own health and peace of

mind, but for others who may be facing similar experiences and aren’t sure

how to cope with them. Today, after all of these years, I am taking charge of

my past by going back to my old boarding school for a visit. Yes, as incredible

as it must seem, I am now driving toward the town of Ulster, Massachusetts.

And out of an abundance of caution, I am issuing this warning before I go on

CLINT ADAMS

8

any further, because the secrets I’m about to tell are not suitable for the prudish

or the faint of heart. And I am being very serious by what I’m saying here.

Sometimes I handled things well, and other times I did not. But good, bad or

otherwise, I intend within this text to describe in brutal detail the events which

came to define my existence while I lived here. And of course, to keep me out

of hot water, I have changed the names or eliminated the names entirely of

everyone I lived with in those days. Also, I have given voice to these people

by using the vernacular of the time. So be advised that a reader who is not up

to the task of learning the truth about what I went through as a boy in boarding

school would probably be better served by putting these pages down now and

searching instead for something light to read, like a romance novel.

I’m driving south now on the highway which leads out of Boston. Already

I can see the town of Framingham through my side window. Before I landed

today, I considered the idea of stopping here first before continuing on down

to Ulster. After all, my memories from this town are just as intense, if not more

so, as all the others I have from this area. But I concluded that I’m not yet ready

to see this place also. In fact, I may never be ready to visit Framingham again.

Just the thought of taking the exit right now and getting off the turnpike sends

shivers up my spine and gives me aching pains all across my stomach. And

then, after a few more moments pass, the sight of Framingham in my rearview

mirror seems to validate my feelings for me and I’m able again to relax. Not

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

Not

this trip, I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

I keep saying to myself. I’m not stopping here today.

Another ten minutes or so and the traffic is finally beginning to thin out.

Thirty years ago I thought Boston was crowded. Today it seems absolutely

clogged with people. Soon though, I’m able to set the cruise control and settle

in for the rest of my journey. If I don’t spend much time looking around in the

town of Ulster or gazing at the lake, I figure I can be on the Academy grounds

in a little over one hour from now. And as I listen to the engine and the tires

do their jobs for me, I remember back to that summer afternoon when the letter

came. Back when all I knew of Massachusetts, besides the boating trips my

dad and I occasionally took to Cape Cod, was what was displayed and

described in the Ulster Academy catalog which had spent the better part of the

spring and summer that year lying on the coffee table in my parents’ living room

in our house in Denver.

“Clint? There’s a letter for you!” my mother called to me from the patio as

I played around that afternoon in the swimming pool we had in our back yard.

She had caught me right as I had begun to wrestle with a floating chair I had

received for my thirteenth birthday a few weeks earlier.

BOARDING SCHOOL

9

“What, Mom?” I hadn’t been able to hear everything she had just said to

me because at the moment she had begun to speak, the chair was winning the

upper hand and I had found myself under water during the first half of her

announcement.

“I said you’ve got a letter. Come on in now so we can see what it says.”

And then my mother turned around and walked back into our house.

“Ok, Mom!” I yelled back. “I’ll be right there!” Quickly then, I swam over

to the side and climbed out of the water. As soon as I was on dry land again,

I started for the house. I knew what letter my mother was talking about and

I was just as excited as she was to find out what it had to say. So without

wasting precious seconds to fuss with my towel, I raced straight into our

kitchen to join my mother.

“Oh, Clint!” my mother sounded appalled when I arrived inside.

“What?” I asked innocently as I took up a position next to her at the kitchen

counter.

“You’re soaking wet! You’re dripping water all over the floor!”

“That’s all right, Maria can clean it up. Is the letter from Ulster?”

“I jus’ cleaned up the floor in here, little man.” Maria suddenly appeared

from the other room and was not amused by my apparent disregard for the

work she had just done.

Now I felt bad. “Oh, Maria. I didn’t mean anything. It’s just water.”

“Jes’, well jou can get the mop and wipe it up jourself.”

“Ok, in a minute.” I didn’t want to get on Maria’s bad side. After all, later

on she might make something like liver for dinner to get back at me. “Go on

and open the letter, Mom.” My attention was now returned to the reason for

all of this commotion.

“Hold your horses, my soggy son. Hold your horses.” With a steak knife,

my mom then slit open the top of the envelope from the all-boys prep school

and pulled out the letter from inside. As soon as she had the paper unfolded,

she began to read to herself.

“What’s it say? What’s it say?” I couldn’t believe that she was making me

wait while she found out first what was in the letter. After all, it was my letter.

Maria suddenly interrupted. “It says jou need to go and get the mop now

to clean up the floor.”

“Oh, Maria,” I tried to make light of her comment. “I promise, I’ll get the

mop out in a minute.”

“Ok, here we go,” my mom finally began to speak again. “To ‘Master

Clinton Adams,’” my mother tried to make her voice sound formal as she read

CLINT ADAMS

10

my letter to me. “‘Dear Clint, After careful consideration of your application

and academic record by our admissions committee and by our board of

trustees, we are pleased to inform you that you have been accepted as a new

first-year student at Ulster Academy and as such, will be expected to attend

our school during the upcoming fall term…’”

“Yippie!” That was all I needed to hear. I was so elated over the news, I

began to jump up and down as I shouted out my joy right there in the kitchen.

“Yippie! Yippie!”

“Oh, Clint!” Mom was now upset with me again. “Now you’re shaking off

water all over the place. Go back outside if you’re going to do that.”

“Yippie! Yippie!” I didn’t stop to engage my parent in further conversation.

I just kept yelling as I hopped through the kitchen and back out onto the patio.

“Yippie! Yippie! Yippie!…” I then kept up my hopping and yelling until I had

hopped all the way back into the swimming pool. “Yippie! Yipppie! Yippie!

Yippie!” SPLASH!